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‘Good English Porridge?”

Today we are still in Northwest Scotland where the characters in my current WIP are involved in a scene that has ‘good English porridge’ at the center and around which all the action revolves. The minute my Scottish hero’s disapproving English step-mother insisted on feeding him a ‘good English porridge,’ I had to know what the difference was. (By the way, the step-mom is a terrible cook so her ‘good English porridge’ is actually pretty bad. My apologies to English cooks everywhere, but I am writing fiction.)

ScottishPORRIDGEAfter a review of several websites, I probably know more about porridge than I could ever want to know. Nonetheless for your benefit and that of my characters let me share what I learned.

First, for those travelers who might imagine I’m writing about oatmeal allow me to clarify. Porridge and oatmeal are not exactly the same thing. Oatmeal is a porridge made from oat grain. Porridge is made from any type of cooked cereal grain. Thus in Northern Scotland during the late 13th century—the time when the book is set—barley is the most likely form of porridge since that grain was the most easily grown in highland soils. Oats are a close second in Scotland and much more likely in England where arable land is more plentiful. Fortunately the scene I’m writing doesn’t require that I specify which grain is used. However, the differences noted above would imply that the step-mother’s offering would be made from oats, whereas a Scottish porridge during this time might well be made from barley or a mixture of available grains. You can read more about this at http://www.buzzle.com/articles/porridge-vs-oatmeal.html.

Also please note that porridge need not be breakfast food. This highly useful dish could be and was served at nearly every time of day with various sweet or savory additions depending on what meal was being served and what sort of flavor was desired. In fact the Castles and Manors website http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/life_04_food.htm#cerials says, “Another common sight at the medieval dinner table was the frumenty, a thick wheat porridge often boiled in a meat broth and seasoned with spices. Porridges were also made of every type of grain and could be served as desserts or dishes for the sick, if boiled in milk (or almond milk) and sweetened with sugar.”

Last I went to http://www.scottish-at-heart.com/porridge-recipe.html in search of ‘porridge trivia’

  • Traditionally, porridge is stirred with a wooden rod called a ‘Spirtle’ or ‘Spurtle’, which looks a bit like a drumstick (not the chicken variety!)
  • Superstition has it that Scottish porridge should always be stirred clockwise – and preferably with your right hand – otherwise the Devil will come for the person doing the stirring!
  • Porridge is traditionally served in wooden bowls, and eaten standing up. Each spoonful should be dipped in a bowl of cream that’s shared by everyone at the table
  • Porridge could well have been the worlds’ first ‘take-out’. Centuries ago, an authentic porridge recipe such as this one would be used to cook up a big pot and what wasn’t eaten for breakfast would be poured into ‘drawers’ or another container and allowed to cool.  Once it was cooled, the porridge could be cut up into slices or blocks, wrapped, and taken along on the days’ work to be eaten for lunch, dinner or a snack!

The humble porridge has even been immortalized in print! The famous Scottish Bard, Robert Burns, described it this way… “But now the supper crowns their simple board, the halesome parritch, chief of Scotias’ food.”

For an excellent discussion of modern oat porridge preparation visit http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2011/nov/10/how-to-cook-perfect-porridge

Do you have a porridge story or recipe you’d like to share with your fellow travelers? Can you identify the building in the featured picture of this post? Please leave a comment and share, this blog is for all who read romances or love to travel.

Jean Drew

Welcome Jean, I’m so happy you’re able to be here. Please tell us a little bit about yourself. I was born in England but live in New Zealand. I once wanted to be the next Agatha Christie but when I read my first romance it was love at first read. But I never say never. I Author, Jean Drewstill might try my hand at a mystery one day.

Please tell us about your most recent release. My most recent release from The Wild Rose Press is called A Man Like Saxon, a contemporary romance set in New Zealand. The hero is a Hollywood movie director who enjoys hot air ballooning, (the ballooning based on my own experiences). He wants to make his movie on the heroine’s land.

And now for Jean’s ‘weird questions.’

1. What is the most distant place you’ve visited (from your home)?AManLikeSaxon_w6532_300

That depends in what you call my home. When I lived in England, New Zealand was furthest from my home. But now I live in New Zealand, England is the furthest. I’ve travelled both ways.

2. If you had to choose between a million bucks and being able to fly, which would you choose?

That depend in what you mean by bucks. If you mean male deer, I’d choose being able to fly. But if you mean dollars, I’d choose dollars.

3. You just got a free plane ticket to anywhere. You have to depart right now. Where are you gonna go?

Monaco, but only if the ticket is first class. I’d like to arrive in the style to which I hope to become accustomed.

4. An angel appears out of Heaven and offers you a lifetime supply of the alcoholic beverage of your choice. “Be brand-specific” it says. Man! What are you gonna say about that? Even if you don’t drink booze there’s something you can figure out… so what’s it gonna be?

Champagne – Dom Perignon

5. Rufus appears out of nowhere with a time-traveling phone booth. You can go anytime in the PAST. What time are you traveling to and what are you going to do when you get there?

Ancient Egypt. I’d spend some time following pharaoh around just to see exactly what he does, see the splendour of his court. Watch the workmen building a pyramid, wander through the markets, really soak up the atmosphere then come back and turn it into a best-selling novel.

6. One night you wake up because you heard a noise. You turn on the light to find that you are surrounded by MUMMIES. The mummies aren’t really doing anything, they’re just standing around your bed. What do you do?

I tell them, “If you weren’t so wrapped up in yourselves you might not have lost your Daddies.” J

Haha! I love your humor and your voice. So, here’s the blurb for Jean’s next terrific book A Man Like Saxon.
Be careful what you wish for. You just might get it.

Danielle Montgomery hides a terrible secret that binds her to a life of loneliness she believes she deserves. She has never wished for anything more from her humdrum life. Up, up and away. Come, fly with sexy Saxon.
When film director, Saxon Wainwright, drops in from a clear blue sky, wanting to make his movie on her property, he blows Danielle’s narrow world apart. Is Saxon the nemesis Danielle is expecting?

Buy Link:
AmazonKindle: A Man Like Saxon