Roslyn Sets the Record Straight*

Hazard Duty Cover ArtCan you believe it? Joe actually thinks we should be grateful to author Rue Allyn for helping us get together. I know better. Ms. Allyn is the one who should be thanking us for providing a terrific story for her to tell. All she did was write down what I told her to write. Even that stuff about Odette came from me. Odette Miller persecuted me from the time I moved to Bird’s Gap until I left for college. So I know that woman better than anyone. Well, anyone except that guy she’s been sleeping with for years but won’t tell anyone about. But enough about Odette. I want to set the record straight about who should get credit for Hazard Duty, and it isn’t Rue Allyn.

She’s got Joe convince that without her help he and I would never have gotten together. Baloney. Joes is the love of my life, although I was too shy in high school to show how interested I was. He always had some other girl hanging on him and he was so handsome. How could I possibly think he’d be interested in brainiac like me? The amazing thing is that he was and still is interested. Love of my life—remember.

Ms. Allyn wants credit for putting us back together, but all she did was nudge Joe in my direction after I whispered the idea in her ear. She’s almost as self-centered as Odette, if Rue imagines she’s responsible for Joe accepting that recruiting assignment. He accepted because he believes in the Navy’s mission and the benefit of service to young Americans as strongly as I believe in the benefits of a college education. As for “sparking my curiosity about my new neighbor,” I’m the one who gave Allyn the idea to put Joe and me in the same house. I told her that my professional reputation would be threatened by being seen too often with Joe. I suggested that she had to put us together in a place where our relationship could blossom without interference or prying eyes.

Still Ms. Allyn was smart enough to realize that my stubbornness was just an act. Once we talked that out, I knew I had to go to Joe and give our love one last shot. So maybe Rue deserves a little credit. Our whole story could have ended tragically if Ms. Allyn hadn’t managed to melt my heart by telling me how much Joe loved me. When I realized that his love was as strong as mine I knew we could overcome any obstacle and live the rest of our lives together.

*You might want to read Joe’s post from June 30, 2013, below. He’s got a slightly different view of things than Roslyn.
Read about Ros and Joe’s first date at http://rueallyn.com/2b21HDexcerpt.html, or just read the blurb given below.

Hazard Duty blurb

Joe Hazard filled all of Ros Duncan’s teenaged fantasies, but now she’s an adult with a mission, and no handsome sailor will get in her way. The first in her family to earn a college education, she escaped Birds Gap, the deadly dull, stifling town of her childhood and the scene of her most embarrassing memories. However as principal of Bird’s Gap High School she wants to see every child in town go to college not be forced to chose between working in the mines or risking life and limb in the military.

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Authorial Voice and Style

NOTESA fellow author asked recently what the difference is between voice and style–a questions many authors (and readers) struggle with.I use music [specifically vocal music] to distinguish between ‘Voice’ and ‘Style’.

Voice is a unique and recognizable combination of tone, pitch, timber and resonance. [I’m certain musicians have a more technical definition.] For example, if you think of the song “The First Time, Ever I Saw Your Face” as sung by both Roberta Flack and Celine Dion the voices are absolutely distinct. The song (and it’s style) is almost exactly the same. However, you cannot mistake which voice is singing when you hear it.

Style may, or may not be unique, but is made up mostly of the artist’s technical choices in things like pace, volume, tonal combinations (chords in multi-voice groups, runs, trills etc. for soloists), and arrangement (which notes are placed where, which octaves are selected etc.). Consider the differences between musical styles like jazz, ragtime, blues, gospel etc. Two individual singers can create radically different versions of the same song not only because of each singer’s unique voice, but also because of the ‘stylistic’ choices the vocalist makes. Further, an artist may change his/her style but cannot change his/her voice (not without considerable effort and expertise).


An author’s ‘voice’ is similar to a vocalist’s in that no two authors will develop the same story idea in the same way. The voice is most evident when a work is read aloud, but still very present when read silently. Authorial voice resembles authorial style in that the tools used to create a unique voice and a unique style are similar—pacing, tone, word choice, volume. However, I could—for example—write in the style of Hemingway, Shakespeare, Fitzgerald, Margaret Mitchell, Charlotte Bronte etc. Yet any story I wrote in another author’s style or the style of another age would always be written in my own voice.


One caution. The terms ‘Voice’ and ‘Style’ are also used to identify specific grammatical structures and practices that have little to do with an individual’s ‘authorial voice and style.’ Be absolutely clear when using these two terms that your audience understands which type of ‘voice’ or ‘style’ you are referring to.

An example that illustrates the points above is my erotic romance Off Limits. I wanted to write a story that resembled O’Henry’s Gift of the Magi, one of my favorite love stories. However, I am not O’Henry. I am Rue Allyn and despite similarities of sacrifices exchanged in the name of love, no one would ever mistake Off Limits for The Gift of the Magi or my voice and style for O’Henry’s.

Here’s a short blurb about Off Limits and a link to more information about the book. For Senior Chief Hank O’Mara no woman Off Limits cover artcould compare with the sea until he met Lieutenant Bethany Morton. Only the sea could draw two passionate people of such opposite backgrounds together, and only US Navy regulations could keep them apart. Because fraternization between Officer and enlisted is forbidden, both Beth and Hank do their utmost to resist the passion and love growing between them. However, love proves stronger than either the sea or the USN. If they are to be together, Hank must sacrifice his career, and Beth will risk the destruction of her professional dreams.

Click here for more about Off Limits http://rueallyn.com/2b1OLexcerpt.html, or buy the book at http://www.amazon.com/Rue-Allyn/e/B00AUBF3NI.

Please leave a comment and share your thoughts about voice and style in the stories you read and/or write. Your comments are my greatest reward. Feel free to share the link to this article with your reader and author friends.

 

Who’s Your Wildfire Love ~ TRS Release Party

Cover art for One Moment's Pleasure ~ Wildfire Love # 1 Cover Art for The Widow's Revenge Off Limits, cover art Cover Art for Hazard Duty, Sexy Sailors # 2

The first of three posts at http://trsparties.com/2013/03/07/whos-your-wildfire-love/ is live. I want readers to choose which Wildfire Love they like best. Check it out and spread the word please. I’m celebrating all of my hunky heroes in three different posts throughout the day, so please keep checking back at http://trsparties.com/2013/03/07/whos-your-wildfire-love/. Comments at the release party are sincerely appreciated.

 

So Nice Sunday, New Reviews

Off Limits, cover artCover Art for The Widow's RevengeLots of good stuff has happened lately.  My publisher likes Hazard Duty, the second in my Sexy Sailor series.  I got to host Patricia Rasey over the weekend.  Hopefully some of you enjoyed meeting her.  And I found new reviews from Long and Short Reviews on my amazon pages, one each for Off Limits and The Widow’s Revenge.  To see the reviews, click  on the covers.

So Nice Sunday!

Yes, I know, today is Saturday, but I couldn’t wait.  I found my first review for Off Limits today (the review came out weeks ago, but I didn’t see it until today.  It was So Nice to find out that the reviewer enjoyed the book enough to give it five hearts.  She said, “Well written with very sexy and imaginative love scenes. I really loved the Senior Chief, who is written as the strong romantic type.”  You can read the entire article at Romance Book Scene .  Please comment and share what was So Nice in your world.